Monday, July 18, 2016

National cuisines and economic strength

Atlantic has an interesting article that charts the "hierarchy of tastes" or social acceptance trajectories of different national cuisines in the United States. In particular, why does the French and Japanese cuisine get admitted to high-ed, white-tablecloth establishments while the Chinese and Indian recipes are relegated to lower-status eateries as "ethnic" food?
Consider the cases of steak frites and carne asada. They both involve cooking a fairly high-quality cut of meat over high heat, and they’re both dishes whose origins are foreign to America. But they’re often listed on American menus at vastly different prices. Why? “The shortest answer would be cultural prestige, some notion of an evaluation of another culture's reputation,” says Krishnendu Ray, an associate professor of food studies at New York University. In a book published earlier this year, The Ethnic Restaurateur, Ray expands on this idea, sketching the tiers of what he calls a “global hierarchy of taste.” This hierarchy, which privileges paninis over tortas, is almost completely shaped by a simple rule: The more capital or military power a nation wields and the richer its emigrants are, the more likely its cuisine will command high menu prices.
Ray consolidated the average price of a meal at a Zagat-listed restaurant in New York and came up with this graphic, which appears to neatly tie up with the hypothesis about relative economic strength of the country. 
Interestingly, Indian cuisine has been falling down the "hierarchy of taste" since 1986!

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